Medicaid Renewal & Redetermination

See how the Medicaid renewal process is changing and what steps you need to take.

At the start of the pandemic, Congress created the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). This act allowed Medicaid participants to stay enrolled throughout the public health emergency without having to renew their Medicaid coverage. However, as of April 2023, all states have returned to the previous Medicaid renewal process. This change requires participants to take specific steps in order to keep their coverage. As a result, those who no longer qualify for Medicaid may lose their coverage, and those who are still eligible for Medicaid may be at risk of losing coverage if they fail to provide the needed information. If you are enrolled in Medicaid, it’s important that you follow your state's renewal process to ensure you do not lose coverage.

Get Ready to Renew

The process for reviewing your Medicaid eligibility and renewing your benefits varies by state. To get started, check your state’s requirements and follow the steps below.

Step 1

Update Your Information

Make sure your state Medicaid agency has your current mailing address, phone number, email address and other contact information so that you’re able to receive important information about your coverage.
Step 2

Check Your U.S. Mail

Your state should mail you a letter about your coverage. This letter will let you know if you need to complete and send a renewal form to check if you still qualify for Medicaid coverage.
Step 3

Complete Your Paperwork

If you receive a renewal form, fill it out and return it to your state right away to avoid any gaps in coverage. For questions about your renewal, contact your state’s Medicaid agency directly.
Step 1

Update Your Information

Make sure your state Medicaid agency has your current mailing address, phone number, email address and other contact information so that you’re able to receive important information about your coverage.
Step 2

Check Your U.S. Mail

Your state should mail you a letter about your coverage. This letter will let you know if you need to complete and send a renewal form to check if you still qualify for Medicaid coverage.
Step 3

Complete Your Paperwork

If you receive a renewal form, fill it out and return it to your state right away to avoid any gaps in coverage. For questions about your renewal, contact your state’s Medicaid agency directly.

Frequently Asked Questions

    Since the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) expired, Medicaid recipients must once again actively renew their coverage every 12 months. The term ‘Medicaid redetermination’ refers to the review of a person’s eligibility for Medicaid. The redetermination, or renewal process, looks at each participant to ensure that they still meet the program’s requirements and are still fit to receive Medicaid. These steps ensure that Medicaid resources are being used effectively and efficiently.

    Everyone currently enrolled in Medicaid will go through the redetermination process. Medicaid reenrollment and redetermination happens at the state level, and each state will follow its own timeline. By keeping your contact information updated with your state, you can ensure that your state’s Medicaid agency will be able to reach you when it is time to review your eligibility.

    Medicaid eligibility requirements vary from state to state. If you are unsure how to qualify for Medicaid, visit HealthCare.gov for information on who’s eligible for Medicaid and other health insurance options.

    Yes, the redetermination and renewal processes differ based on the state and the specific Medicaid program you are enrolled in. To learn how to apply for Medicaid, receive updates and access other beneficiary resources, visit your state's official Medicaid website or get in touch with your state's Medicaid agency directly.

    Medicaid renewals vary by state and may take up to 14 months to address all participants. Your state will send you a letter by U.S. mail to confirm that your information is up to date, so be sure to keep your contact information current with the state.

    The period for hearing back from Medicaid can vary based on more than one factor. These factors include the state you’re in, the specific circumstances of your application or renewal and the volume of applications being processed. If you have not received a notification from Medicaid and your renewal is approaching, it’s important to reach out to your state’s Medicaid agency and ask about the status of your account. It’s essential to complete your renewal on time to avoid losing Medicaid eligibility or coverage.

    The redetermination process may take multiple weeks. The exact timing depends on your local Medicaid agency. To check the status of your redetermination, contact the agency where you initially applied.

    The Medicaid redetermination period allows your state’s Medicaid agency to review the eligibility of all participants. During this process, they will check your income, household composition and other relevant factors. If you’ve had changes that impact your eligibility, you may no longer meet the thresholds for Medicaid and may experience changes to your benefits or even loss of coverage. It's important to respond quickly to any requests for information during the redetermination or renewal process to make sure that you do not experience a lapse in insurance coverage.

    Beneficiaries who are no longer eligible for Medicaid will generally have two options: An employer-sponsored plan or a plan obtained through the Health Insurance Marketplace. This change will be treated as a special enrollment period. Individuals will have 60 days to secure new insurance. If you no longer meet the eligibility requirements for Medicaid and don’t apply for new insurance during this timeframe, you’ll need to wait until the next open enrollment period to sign up for insurance coverage. It’s important that beneficiaries enroll in a qualified health plan as soon as they know they no longer meet the Medicaid eligibility criteria to avoid any lapse in insurance coverage.

    For the latest updates and resources on Medicaid coverage in your state, visit your state's official Medicaid website or contact your state's Medicaid agency directly. Since Medicaid programs are provided at the state level, these official sources can keep you informed about any changes and supply access to resources for your specific location.

    If you’ve recently moved, had a significant change in income or undergone any other relevant life changes, it’s important to contact the Medicaid agency in your state. To update your information, follow these steps:

    1. Contact your local Medicaid agency for the most correct and updated information on required documents and the process for updating your information.
    2. Gather any necessary documents. Common documents may include proof of income, residency, changes in household composition or other relevant information.
    3. Submit the required documents. This may involve sending forms, proof of income or other relevant paperwork.

The content of this webpage is provided for informational purposes only. Keep in mind that the specific requirements can vary by state and are subject to change, so be sure to contact your state's Medicaid agency directly for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

Information Last Updated: 12/12/2023

Tools & Resources